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In Memorium: Life, Death and Leaves (October Re-run)

It’s  October again.  Sadly, I have nothing to add to the tribute of a month that is simultaneously my most favorite and most un-favorite of seasons.  I present, therefore, a rerun form two years ago while I contemplate creating some new content.

“Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower”–Albert Camus

Lest the general levity of this blog give you a false impression of my worldview, let me state that sometimes life sucks.  For the most part, I use humor and satire as a defense and an escape, a diversion if you will.   This has been an incredibly bittersweet week; I have never experienced anything remotely like it.   My last post was Freshly Pressed–perhaps the ultimate honor for a WordPress blogger.  Yet while this was going on, three people I know died.  They were an 82-year-old uncle whose death had been anticipated, a 58-year-old work colleague whose demise was an unexpected shock, and most tragically, the 29-year-old son of one of my poker buddies whose death from illness had been feared for some time.

If you will permit me then, a tribute to these lost souls with the only piece of poetry I ever wrote which I would deem publishable.  It’s well over 35-years old–the sort of thing one could only write in one’s youth.

The Leaves

Words ©1976, 2012  Mark Sackler

Sit and look at the leaves,

Amber arms descending from October’s trees.

Covering delicate grasses,

sweeping the highway,

bedding the rain,

Solemn songs to life departed,

Sit and look at the leaves.

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Photo Op #7–Halloweirdos

“I haven’t seen my analyst in 200 years.  If I had been going all this time, I’d probably be cured by now.”–Woody Allen, as Miles Monroe, in Sleeper.

“We should have had sex, but there weren’t enough people.”–Diane Keaton, as Luna Schlosser, in Sleeper.

Halloween does bring out the weirdos.  In this case me, emulating one of my favorite personages to quote, and my better half.  The characters are from the Woody Allen 1973 classic, Sleeper, which in my estimation is one of the funniest movies ever made.  His comic genius reached an apex with great gags, including the orb, the orgasmatron and the discovery of a 200 year old Volkswagen Beetle that started up on the first try.

We'll get stoned with the orb.  We would have brought the orgasmatron to the party but it wouldn't fit in the car.

We’ll get stoned with the orb. We would have brought the orgasmatron, but it wouldn’t fit in the car.

Gimme that!

Gimme that!  (Don’t we look just like Diane and Woody?)

The original orgsasmatron.  Woohoo!

The original orgsasmatron. Woohoo!

The original Woody!

The original Woody!

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Photo Op #6: The U.S. Open

“This taught me a lesson, but I’m not quite sure what it is.”–John McEnroe

“I smile a lot, I win a lot, and I’m really sexy.”–Serena Williams

My golf AND tennis games feel like this sometimes.

My golf AND tennis games feel like this sometimes.

Check off another bucket list item.  I finally spent a day at the U.S. Open tennis championship, on Tuesday, September 3.  It taught me a couple of things, and unlike John McEnroe, it think I know what they are.

The first is, what in the world was I waiting for?  I should have done this years ago, considering I live only about 65 miles (or 100km) from the Billie Jean King Tennis Center.  The second?  If’ I’m going to take pictures, maybe I should bring something more advanced than my iPhone 4.  Yes, I actually am considering the upgrade to the 5S based on the reviews I’ve read of the camera.  In spite of my previous post, I’m betting I can’t  get any more distracted than I already am.  Take a look at the following images and then take the poll to provide me with your opinion of what I should do for a camera if I go next year.  Oh, as far as the question of Serena being sexy, we’ll keep those opinions to ourselves.

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The view from my seat from the loge in Ashe Stadium. The iPhone 4 picture only makes it look like nose bleed territory.

The view from my seat from the loge in Ashe Stadium. The iPhone 4 picture only makes it look like nose bleed territory.

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THE DRAW

THE DRAW

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The top seeded women's doubles team of Errani and Vinci going about their business.

The top seeded women’s doubles team of Errani and Vinci going about their business.

OK.   So now, tell me what I should do for capturing images if I go to open next year.

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Cosmic Quote #21

“What do I do in the winter when there is no baseball?  I look out the window and wait for spring.”–Rogers Hornsby

I have previously posted this picture.    This is how I feel when spring has finally sprung. (That’s not me in the picture, I have no idea who it is.  My camera timing was just perfect, and more than a bit lucky.)

Pura Vida.  A beach near Puerto Viejo, Costa Rica.January, 2008.   Copyright Mark Sackler, 2008.

Pura Vida.  Copyright Mark Sackler, 2008.

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Photo Op#2: Storm Damage

 “It is only in sorrow that bad weather masters us; in joy we face the storm and defy it.”–Amelia Barr

There will be no poetry; there will certainly be no wise-cracks.  I will even refrain from New Jersey jokes.

We had no power for six days, but on balance we were extremely lucky.  How is the following for an equation of everyday life?

325 +7 = 0. 

For my readers on the metric system I will put it this way.

100+11=0.

Translation? 325 feet (~100m) above sea level and 7 miles (~11km) inland equals no flooding damage.  But as the pictures herein demonstrate, we had plenty of tree damage and some fence damage to go with it.  Nothing came near the house. My thoughts and best wishes go out to those in NY and NJ who were not so spared (and there was plenty of damage here in CT, fortunately we did not get the worst of it).

These uprooted trees lean away from our driveway, but directly over the neighbor’s fence and storage shed.

Most of our downed trees were in the woods. This is the most impressive one.

Minor fence damage.

Equines present and accounted for. We now return you to our regularly scheduled program.

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Photo Op #1: Past the Peak

“One is forever throwing away substance for shadows.”–Jennie Churchill

She rode from the leaves

For the shadows were deeper,

Light…dark…

…and matter…

Words and images ©2012 Mark Sackler

 

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Time Out: Google This! (or The Color of Stupidity, Part 2)

“The Internet is a good way to get on the net.”–Bob Dole

I preferred the candidate that did not need such enhancement. Credit: Edward Cropper. Click image for link.

The above quote has to be the best thing Yogi Berra never said.  But I digress even before I get started.

With increased traffic comes increased search engine hits.  With increased search engine hits comes more great, completely irrelevant material.  I won’t bore you with repeating the whole story, if you missed the first installment of this feature, you can read it here.   So without further ado, let’s see what some of the less-than-sentient beings out there have been up to–here are more search engine queries that somehow found this blog, each followed, as usual, by my astute analysis.  (Image credit: Edward Cropper)

Vidoe— noe kiddinck?

Stupid names for your entertainment–I already covered that in detail here,  but how about….hmmm….Adam Sandler movies?

Equaions (sic!) in everyday life–the search engines speak Klingon now.

Examples of square roots in real life–my response is too terrifying for a family blog.  Click here if you must know the answer. (Actually, it’s really worth the click 😀 )

Satir Kipec–Nagrado žirija lahko podeli  (I hope that’s not obscene–I copied it from the start of the first link this search term returned.)

Figure X. Schipperke [Pronunciation: Skip-it; Origin, Dutch: Little S&$^%#–er, I mean Little Captain] Noun: 1. A Furry black dog of Belgian origin 2. Trouble waiting to happen

I’m part Schipperke–I bet you’re a little bit pregnant, too.

Examples of squares in everyday life–Bob Dole and Howard Walowitz.

Did Schrödinger’s cat blow up?–No, but it did come away with a hickey.

Malenium (sic!) conjectures–guys don’t conjecture; we just take wild guesses.

We also write wild blog posts.  Stay tuned.  There are evidently bound to be more of these.

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In Memorium: Life, Death and Leaves

“Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower”–Albert Camus

Lest the general levity of this blog give you a false impression of my worldview, let me state that sometimes life sucks.  For the most part, I use humor and satire as a defense and an escape, a diversion if you will.   This has been an incredibly bittersweet week; I have never experienced anything remotely like it.   My last post was Freshly Pressed–perhaps the ultimate honor for a WordPress blogger.  Yet while this was going on, three people I know died.  They were an 82-year-old uncle whose death had been anticipated, a 58-year-old work colleague whose demise was an unexpected shock, and most tragically, the 29-year-old son of one of my poker buddies whose death from illness had been feared for some time.

If you will permit me then, a tribute to these lost souls with the only piece of poetry I ever wrote which I would deem publishable.  It’s well over 35-years old–the sort of thing one could only write in one’s youth.

The Leaves

Words ©1976, 2012  Mark Sackler

Sit and look at the leaves,

Amber arms descending from October’s trees.

Covering delicate grasses,

sweeping the highway,

bedding the rain,

Solemn songs to life departed,

Sit and look at the leaves.

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